Curious winter allergies: patient shows severe allergic reactions to winter cold

21-year-old woman allergic to the Winter

Many people stay in the Winter indoors because temperatures feel the cold very unpleasant. In the case of a young woman from Canada, the cold can be, but sometimes even dangerous to life. Because the 21-Year-old suffering from a cold Allergy.

Several stays in hospital due to cold Allergy

Dry skin in the Winter is truly nothing out of the ordinary. Also other skin problems are common in the cold Season. In the case of people suffering from a “cold urticaria” (also known as “Allergy to cold”), the low temperatures, particularly intense: itching, hives, swelling, or redness of the skin. In the worst case, it may even lead to a life-threatening allergic shock. A young woman from Canada is especially suffering from the rare disease. The 21-Year-old had to several times, therefore, even to the hospital.

Suffocation-Like Shortness Of Breath

The urticaria, hives or nettle rash, is the most common disease of the skin. Approximately one in four people suffering at some point in his life at least once.

The causes of hives can have many different reasons: incompatibility, infections or physical stimuli such as pressure or light.

“Cold can be a trigger for urticaria”, writes the German Allergy and asthma Federation (DAAB) on its website.

“In the affected “cold-allergic” itching, hives, swelling, or redness of the skin,” says the expert.

And: “In very rare but dangerous cases, the mucous membranes in the mouth and throat area to swell, and suffocation – like shortness of breath can lead.”

Even the Opening of the refrigerator can be problematic

In the case of Arianna Kent, the complaints are often so strong that they must because of their “Allergy to cold” again and again to the hospital.

According to a report in the British newspaper “Daily Mail”, lives the 21-Year-old in Edmonton, Canada, where temperatures up to -40 ° C can be reached.

Avoiding it is often to leave the house, even to Go to your car “is potentially dangerous”.

The information that you do not need to be careful when you step Out, but when she opens the refrigerator, eats ice cream or a glass with ice.

“I’ve probably had thousands of reactions,” said the 21-Year-old.

It’ll start mostly with a rash on the Arm that is getting bigger and bigger. The disease “causes, that my skin burns and itches. For my throat it is like Asthma.“

She added: “I can get an anaphylactic shock, so I have to carry an EpiPen with me.”

Improvement through change in Diet

“People don’t believe me or don’t know that it is a true Allergy,” said the young woman, who had the first allergic reactions the age of 14, as she shoveled snow.

Even Doctors are often clueless, but in the meantime you could deal better with the patient.

“Most of the time, when I get to the hospital now, I’m two hours there. You give me adrenaline and warm liquids,“ the 21-Year-old.

With time, Ms. Kent was able to reduce the number of hospital admissions from three times a month to Once a month.

This became possible because they changed their diet, and their consumption of foods that contain histamine, have been reduced.

You can avoid foods such as cheese, yogurt, cream, pickled vegetables and pineapple. (ad)

Curious winter allergies: patient shows severe allergic reaction to the winter cold

21-year-old woman allergic to the Winter

Many people stay in the Winter indoors because temperatures feel the cold very unpleasant. In the case of a young woman from Canada, the cold can be, but sometimes even dangerous to life. Because the 21-Year-old suffering from a cold Allergy.

Several stays in hospital due to cold Allergy

Dry skin in the Winter is truly nothing out of the ordinary. Also other skin problems are common in the cold Season. In the case of people suffering from a “cold urticaria” (also known as “Allergy to cold”), the low temperatures, particularly intense: itching, hives, swelling, or redness of the skin. In the worst case, it may even lead to a life-threatening allergic shock. A young woman from Canada is especially suffering from the rare disease. The 21-Year-old had to several times, therefore, even to the hospital.

Suffocation-Like Shortness Of Breath

The urticaria, hives or nettle rash, is the most common disease of the skin. Approximately one in four people suffering at some point in his life at least once.

The causes of hives can have many different reasons: incompatibility, infections or physical stimuli such as pressure or light.

“Cold can be a trigger for urticaria”, writes the German Allergy and asthma Federation (DAAB) on its website.

“In the affected “cold-allergic” itching, hives, swelling, or redness of the skin,” says the expert.

And: “In very rare but dangerous cases, the mucous membranes in the mouth and throat area to swell, and suffocation – like shortness of breath can lead.”

Even the Opening of the refrigerator can be problematic

In the case of Arianna Kent, the complaints are often so strong that they must because of their “Allergy to cold” again and again to the hospital.

According to a report in the British newspaper “Daily Mail”, lives the 21-Year-old in Edmonton, Canada, where temperatures up to -40 ° C can be reached.

Avoiding it is often to leave the house, even to Go to your car “is potentially dangerous”.

The information that you do not need to be careful when you step Out, but when she opens the refrigerator, eats ice cream or a glass with ice.

“I’ve probably had thousands of reactions,” said the 21-Year-old.

It’ll start mostly with a rash on the Arm that is getting bigger and bigger. The disease “causes, that my skin burns and itches. For my throat it is like Asthma.“

She added: “I can get an anaphylactic shock, so I have to carry an EpiPen with me.”

Improvement through change in Diet

“People don’t believe me or don’t know that it is a true Allergy,” said the young woman, who had the first allergic reactions the age of 14, as she shoveled snow.

Even Doctors are often clueless, but in the meantime you could deal better with the patient.

“Most of the time, when I get to the hospital now, I’m two hours there. You give me adrenaline and warm liquids,“ the 21-Year-old.

With time, Ms. Kent was able to reduce the number of hospital admissions from three times a month to Once a month.

This became possible because they changed their diet, and their consumption of foods that contain histamine, have been reduced.

You can avoid foods such as cheese, yogurt, cream, pickled vegetables and pineapple. (ad)

New treatment to protect people with peanut allergies ready for FDA review: Most in study tolerated equivalent of two peanuts a day

The final research results for a new treatment for protection against accidental exposure to peanut was presented today at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The results show it is possible for some people with peanut allergy to protect themselves from accidental ingestion by building up their tolerance to peanut over time.

“We’re excited about the potential to help children and adolescents with peanut allergy protect themselves against accidentally eating a food with peanut in it,” says allergist Stephen Tilles, MD, ACAAI past president, study co-author, and consulting advisor for Aimmune Therapeutics. “Our hope when we started the study was that by treating patients with the equivalent of one peanut per day, many would tolerate as much as two peanuts. We were pleased to find that two thirds of the people in the study were able to tolerate the equivalent of two peanuts per day after nine to 12 months of treatment, and half the patients tolerated the equivalent of four peanuts.”

Study participants ranged in age from 4 to 55 years, most were 4 to 17, and all had peanut allergy. One third of the participants were given a placebo, while the remaining two-thirds were given peanut protein powder in increasing amounts until reaching the “maintenance dose” — the dose they stayed on for the remainder of the study. The maintenance does was the equivalent of one peanut daily.

“This is not a quick fix, and it doesn’t mean people with peanut allergy will be able to eat peanuts whenever they want,” says allergist Jay Lieberman, MD, vice chair of the ACAAI Food Allergy Committee and study co-author. “But it is definitely a breakthrough. The hope would be to have a treatment available in the second half of 2019. If that happens, people who receive and are able to tolerate this treatment should be protected from accidental exposures.”

All those in the study received peanut protein as part of an oral food challenge (OFC). A person in an OFC is given a very small dose of the food by mouth under the supervision of a board-certified allergist to test for a severe reaction. OFCs are considered the gold standard for testing food allergy.

“Reactions from the oral challenges at the end of the study were much milder than prior to treatment,” says Dr. Tilles. “On average, the participants were able to tolerate a 100-fold higher dose of peanut at the end of the study than they did at the beginning. In addition, the symptoms caused by the 100-fold higher dose at the end of study were milder than the symptoms on the lower dose at the beginning of the study.”

Facts about this pivotal study:

  • More participants and more detailed data than all prior oral immunotherapy studies combined
  • Fewer severe allergic reactions requiring epinephrine during oral food challenges
  • Fewer side effects than anticipated — e.g. only six percent dropped out of the study due to gastrointestinal side effects; Also, one-third of patients completed the study with no more than mild side effects along the way.
  • 80 percent of participants successfully reached daily maintenance dose of the equivalent of one peanut.

There are currently no approved treatment options for peanut allergy. If this treatment is approved by the FDA, it will be available by prescription, and people with peanut allergy will need to remain on it to stay protected against accidental consumption. Once someone stops the treatment, there is no longer a protective effect.

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