Yes, photoshopped ‘beauty’ should be banned

I have known media owner and personality Mia Freedman for 25 years and count her as one of my dearest friends. As we now live in different states, we don’t get to eyeball each other as much as we used to and so, when I received a newsletter she sends out to her enormous fan base recently complete with a recent selfie, I was taken aback at how, well, weird she looked. Now, I’ve seen this woman in all states good and bad but not like this. My first thought was she was sick. Then I wondered if she’d had work on her face but aware it is against her feminist beliefs, knew that couldn’t be the reason.

Mia Freedman, co-founder and creative director of Mamamia, as she actually looks (without the photo filters).Credit:Cybele Malinowski

It was only after I started reading her angry letter that I understood why she looked like an anaemic cadaver – her new phone had made her that way. Only she didn’t want it to. She didn’t process her selfie through a filter or photoshop it up the wazoo in an app like so many do. No, her new phone automatically adjusted her selfie with a “beauty” setting that was supposed to enhance her image to fit a more agreeable norm.

Mia explained her phone had three filters – Smoother Skin, Thinner Face and Warmth – which could be scaled from 0-12. “Much to my horror, the DEFAULT settings for Smoother Skin and Thinner face were both at 6/12,” she wrote. “So, my phone was automatically making me look 50 per cent more smooth, thin and white than I actually am.”

So, what in reality this phone and its manufacturers are telling us is we are not OK the way we are and that we actually should want to look thinner, paler and smoother and, as such, are making the choice to alter our images for us. A public service of sorts! And, as Mia pointed out, “Since women are overwhelmingly the takers of selfies, this serves to undermine us every time we look in the mirror which, so far, doesn't come with an in-built filter.”

Actress and presenter Jameela Jamil.

Now, I have been most vocal in the past about my belief that Instagram is the devil and how it has made me feel like crap each time I’ve scrolled through its carefully curated images. But part of my animosity towards the social medium is not just the fact that people are portraying their lives as perfect when no one’s is, they are portraying their appearances as something they are not, too – filtered replicas that are more illustration than reflection. And this is not just sad, it is truly sick.

My rage in this regard is shared by British actress Jameela Jamil, who I had enjoyed watching in the comedy The Good Place on Netflix. Yes, Jameela is attractive – show me a young woman on TV today who isn’t – but because she is of Indian and Pakistani descent, it’s not in the traditional glossy magazine/advertising blonde Mattel-worthy way. But this beauty also has something to say, and that is that even she has been victim to the belief she is not beautiful enough. And she is angry that this is the case.

Starting her career as a UK morning TV presenter, Jameela admitted in early interviews that she suffered an eating disorder as a teenager because she was inundated with magazine images that made her feel fat and unworthy. After overcoming her body issues, she found herself being body shamed again after gaining almost 30 kilos after taking steroids to help her asthma. Realising that there weren’t clothes to fit her at that size, instead of resorting dangerous diets and self-flagellation, she launched a clothing line that would with sizes that would, ranging from a 10 to 32.

She then created @i_weigh on Instagram, “a movement for us to feel valuable and see how amazing we are, and look beyond the flesh on our bones” which now has some 250,000 untouched-up followers. More recently, she took on celebrities Cardi B, Iggy Azalea and Khloe Kardashian for advertising “detox teas” supposed to aid weight loss, writing in response: “GOD I hope all these celebrities all shit their pants in public, the way the poor women who buy this nonsense upon their recommendation do.” (These teas are known for their aggressive laxative properties.)

Then, this week, Jameela wrote a piece for the BBC which had me believing this young woman is one of the most refreshing voices in feminism today. Calling for airbrushed photos to be banned and describing them as a “crime against humanity”, Jameela asked how digitally altered images that actually lie to the consumer and sell a fantasy that perfection is indeed possible, are “ethical or even legal?”.

“Filters and digital editing have almost certainly contributed to the fact so many of the women I know have turned to needles, knives and extreme diets to try to match their online avatar,” she writes. “When photo editors try to lighten my skin and change my ethnicity, it's bad for the girls who are looking at the picture. But it's also bad for my mental health. It's a message from the editor to me that I am not good enough as I am.”

Citing UK studies that echo Australian research showing a majority of teenage girls today don’t think they are pretty enough (one study showed 93 per cent think they're judged on their appearance more than their ability), Jameela urges women to spurn their social media filters and delete photo editing apps.

“We need to see spots. We need to see wrinkles. We need to see cellulite and stretch marks. If not, we will become almost allergic to the sight of them, even though we all have these things on our own bodies,” she writes.

“Don't give your money to any institution that sells you the lie of 'perfection'. They are trying to break you, so you will hate yourself and go out and buy something you don't need, in order to fix something that was never broken in the first place.”

But it seems Jameela's detractors feel that, because she is beautiful, she can’t speak on behalf of those who aren’t. Which in my mind is yet another filter being placed on a woman’s acceptability according to her appearance. And it takes only a glance at Mia’s thin, pale, line-free face to know we already have way too many of those.

Wendy Squires is a regular columnist.

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Beauty by PopSugar to Launch on QVC

Beauty by PopSugar is making its QVC debut.
The beauty brand from the Millennial media destination is set to launch on Friday night seven products in an hour-long spot on Beauty iQ, Qurate Retail Group's beauty-specific platform. Kirbie Johnson, a senior reporter and producer at PopSugar with 34 million Instagram followers of her own, will be the host, introducing products such as the Be Noticed Eye Shimmer Putty Powder and Peace.Love.Lips.Kit, a BeautyiQ exclusive. The products will also be sold on qvc.com.
The program will be streamed across Beauty iQ and PopSugar's social media platforms.
"It really came down to the product — nothing matters unless our customer responds to the product," said Rob Robillard, vice president of integrated beauty merchandising at Qurate Retail Group. "When we started to play and go through the products and packaging, I was blown away by the quality of the products, the idea of buildable coverage — you can start with something subtle and wear it over the day and build it up at night."
For QVC, nabbing beauty by PopSugar is also a way to attract younger consumers to its viewing platforms. For PopSugar's beauty brand, which launched in March, the rollout to Beauty iQ is meant to build brand awareness.
"It's coming with this built-in audience, which is great," said Robillard.
While PopSugar plans to blast the news of the launch out to its social channels, it is also hoping to get noticed by Beauty iQ's existing network of beauty shoppers. Beauty iQ is Qurate's fastest-growing platform, said Robillard — the digitally focused venture, which launched two years ago, has grown its sales triple-digits in 2018.
"For us it's another way to reach a new audience," said Lisa Sugar, founder and president of PopSugar. "I love the fact that QVC gives us the opportunity to describe the products and how good the ingredients are."
Products launching on Beauty iQ include Just Enough Tinted  Moisturizer, $35; Be Noticed Eye Shimmer Putty Powder,$23.00; Be Relentless Stay Put Eyeliner Trio, $29.00; Thick + Thin Mascara, $25.00; Triple Play 3-in-1 Brow, $23.00; Be Bright Shimmer Highlighter, $32.00 Peace. Love. Lips. Kit $38.00.
Beauty by PopSugar, which launched in March of this year, was developed through a licensing agreement with Bona Fide Beauty Lab, a beauty incubator founded by industry veterans Pamela Baxter and Cathy O'Brien.
The products are a result of a survey that PopSugar sent out to thousands of its readers — they consist of multipurpose, trend-driven items desired by Millennial and Gen Z shoppers. They are formulated with a "No Bad Ingredients" mantra.
Beauty by PopSugar is also sold in about 250 Ulta Beauty doors and on its own web site, beautybypopsugar.com. QVC is its first retail venture after Ulta, which was originally its exclusive retail partner.
Said Baxter, "Beauty iQ is very beneficial for indie brands that have a story to tell. An hour-long show is really unprecedented from a brand point of view to really tell the brand story from beginning to end." 
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These Women Are Smashing Their Makeup Because They're Sick of Insane Beauty Standards

A new feminist movement is sweeping Instagram, as some South Korean women are rebelling against unattainable beauty standards that have become a cultural norm in their country. The movement, called Escape the Corset, sprang up over the summer on YouTube and Twitter, and is now gaining momentum on Instagram. It’s a call to arms for women to ditch their insanely extensive skincare and makeup routines and embrace minimalism.

As the 8th largest cosmetics market in the world, South Korea represents nearly 3% of the global market. In 2017, the Korea Herald reported that most girls between the ages of 10 and 12 owned an average of three beauty products. If you’re familiar with K-Beauty, this is probably not too surprising: The whole world has become obsessed with the country’s famous multi-step routines (think: 10-12 different skincare products diligently applied twice a day). It’s also not uncommon for South Korean high schoolers to get plastic surgery for graduation, according to The Atlantic.

In response, more and more South Koreans are making their voices heard on Instagram to push back against impossible beauty expectations for women. Lipstick and long platinum blonde locks are being swapped for bare-faced complexions and dark, lived-in haircuts. They’re sloughing off layers of makeup in order to ground themselves in authenticity.

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현재의 나와 인형으로 살던 7개월 전의 나 긴 금발머리에 항상 치마를 입고 화장을 공들여 하던 나를 성별을 떠나 모든 사람들이 예뻐했다. 심리학과에 금발머리하면 내가 떠오를만큼 나는 화려하게 꾸미고 다니길 좋아했다. 실제로 내 옷장엔 바지가 사계절 다 합해서 두 벌 밖에 없었으며, 겨울에도 살색스타킹을 신고 다니고, 갖고 있던 섀도우와 립 종류는 50개를 넘어섰다. 나는 인형처럼 귀엽고 사랑스러운 나를 너무 좋아했고, 딱 그만큼 그것들을 버리기가 힘들었다. 하지만 나는 인형이 되는 것을 그만두었다. 그 후 아침에 잠을 좀 더 자고, 매 달 꾸밈노동으로 나가던 xx만원으로 맛있는 것을 먹고, 삶의 질을 높이는데 사용하게 되었다. 탈코르셋 후 나에 대해 이런 저런 말들이 많이 오가지만 사실 남자들이 하는 말들은 전혀 타격감이 없다. 페미니즘에 있어서는 남자들이 왈가부가하는 말은 가치가 없다. 그치만 여자들이 얘기하는건 다르다. 여성들이 하는 말은 더 깊게 느껴지고 많은 생각들을 낳는다. 페미에 관심도 없고 내가 무슨 생각과 심정으로 다 버렸는지도 모르면서 6인형일 때가 더 예쁘다9 라고 하는건 날 너무 허무하게한다. 올해 여름의 나는 사람들이 나로 인해 관습적인 여성상을 조금이나마 부술 수 있었으면 좋겠다는 신념 하나로 머리를 잘랐다. 그러니 내가 사람들에게 탈코르셋을 강요하지 않는 것처럼, 적어도 여성들은 더 이상 나에게 코르셋을 강요하지 않았으면 좋겠다. #탈코르셋 #탈코 #탈코인증 #탈코르셋은해방입니다

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This woman wrote that she used to wear fleshy tights in winter (a.k.a., froze for the sake of dressing in a more feminine manner) and had more than 50 shades of lipstick and lip stains. She decided to swap her blonde tresses for a dark, more natural pixie cut in order to liberate herself from her culture’s beauty standards. She signs her post off with #freethecorset.

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힘들어하는 나에게 “누군가에게 용기를 주기위해서” 라는 실체없는 대의적 명분에 매달리지말라고 친구가 조언해줬다. 누가 정말 뒷통수를 친기분이 였다 나는 은연중에 내가 용기가 될려고 발버둥 쳤나보다 이 좆같은 혐생에서 내존재가 용기조차 안된다면 포기하고싶어질까봐 더욱더 “용기”라는 단어에 목매달았던거같다. 다른사람에게 용기라도 되고싶었나보다. 잠시라도 코르셋을 다시입고싶다는 생각을 했었고 그생각에 자괴감에 빠졌었다. 하지만 빠질필요없다 이좆같이 코르셋 강요당하는 사회에서 그렇게 학습해온 내가 흔들 릴 수 있는거 아닌가 결론은 코르셋을 입지않은 불보지인데 결론을 코르셋은 절대 입을 수 없는걸로 내리면된다. 입을게 아니라는걸로 내리면된다. 나는 용기일 필요없다 오늘도 이렇게 내사진을 보며 저때의 내모습을 상기하며 인형같은삶을 안타까워할것이다. 내가 돌아가지않을려는 발악이다. 날위한것이다. 지칠땐 지칠꺼고 힘들땐 힘들꺼고 주저앉고싶으면 주저앉을꺼다. 대신 절때 후퇴하지 않겠다 절대 절대 절대 세상이 날 힘들게 하는만큼 더 내가가는 길이 옳은걸 아니깐 . 페미니즘을 접해서 알게되서 배울 수 있어서 이 부조리함을 알 수 있어 너무 다행이다. #탈코르셋#탈코#인형#디폴트#페미니즘#디폴트운동 사진 무단 도용시 법적 처벌합니다. 사진 컨택은 디엠으로 남초커뮤나 페북으로 사진 퍼갈때 컨택하고 가져가라 좃팔놈들아; 내초상권있다

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Another woman showcased her hair transformation, writing that although at first chopping her hair was scary, she wanted to give other women “courage” to rid themselves of “the corset” for good.

Hand-in-hand with the Escape the Corset movement, the Skin-Care Diet (as described by Allure), is another social revolution currently being embraced by South Koreans. The idea: By removing most skincare products from your routine, you can find out what your skin can live without and what it actually needs. This usually boils down to a cleanser, moisturizer, and SPF, all free of harsh ingredients.

Instead of tossing their compacts and lipstick bullets in the garbage, South Korean women are literally crushing beauty standards by sharing images of their pulverized makeup. They’re pressing the creamy, powdery, oily contents onto paper in wild, waxy, crayon-like works of art. They’re not playing.

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파데 섀도우 아이라인 눈썹은 다 버렸지만 중학생부터 "여자는 입술이 이뻐야 한다" "여자애가 좀 발라야지 주변 남자들이 좋아한다" 제일 버리기 힘든 입술 코르셋  코르셋을 벗기 시작한 2주 전부터 하나씩 고쳐나갔다 화장을 안 하고 다이어트를 안 하고하지만 입술을 한 시간마다 발랐다 음식을 먹고 나서도 혹시나 다른 사람이 내 얼굴을 보고 입술 지적을 할까 봐 너무 불안했다 오늘 마음먹고 내가 제일 잘 '사용했던' 립스틱을 다 버리려고 한다  중1부터 지금까지 조이던 코르셋을 벗는다 #탈코르셋 #탈코르셋은해방입니다

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Paired with an image of smeared lipsticks and stains, one woman commented that her makeup collection once seemed like “meaningful consumption,” but now it’s just “garbage.” She writes that she wonders how she will spend her money going forward.

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나는 예뻐지고 싶었다. 못생긴 내 얼굴이 싫었다. 나는 자존감이 낮아서 화장이라는 6가면9을 쓰고 다녔다. 눈 위의 선, 칠해진 입술로 자존감은 오락가락했다. 민낯을 보여주면 나에게 못생겼다는 말을 할까봐 , 또 자존감이 낮아지고 우울 해 질까봐 항상 화장을 하고 다녔다. 그래서 집 앞의 마트도 화장하고 나가야 했다. 화장이 잘 안 먹은 날에는 학교에 가지않았다. 풀메 중 하나라도 빼먹으면 하루종일 불안해 하고 아이라인을 짝짝이로 그린 날에는 거울을 붙잡고 있었다. —— 하지만 이젠 그러지 않아도 된다. 예쁘지 않아도 된다. 가면은 내 본 모습이 아니란 걸 너무 늦게 알았다. 그 동안 나를 괴롭히고 내 삶을 망쳤던 가면을 벗었다. —— 탈코르셋을 하면서 나의 본 모습 그대로 사랑 할 수 있게 되었다. 이게 내 얼굴이다. —— #페미니스트 #페미니즘 #탈코르셋 #탈코 #탈코르셋은해방입니다 #디폴트 #디폴트운동 #한남 #좆까 #화장 #안해 #탈코르셋전시

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“I hated my ugly face,” wrote another woman. She shared that she even skipped school on days where her makeup wasn’t up to par. Now, she says she realizes she doesn’t have to focus so much on appearances. “I took off the mask that was ruining my life,” she wrote.

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#탈코르셋 #탈코전시 #탈코르셋은해방입니다 #도비는자유에요#나는인형이아니야 #나는사람이다 제일 빨리 벗은 코르셋은 화장이었다 8개월 정도 된 것 같은데 내 서랍 두 칸 정도를 차지하는 화장품은 버리지 못하겠더라 투블럭을 하기 전에는 혹시 모르니까. 어쩔 수 없이 해야 하는 날이 있지 않을까 하는 생각이 가끔씩 들어 그랬던거였겠지 화장하는 것보다 화장품 모으는 걸 좋아했다 내 취미생활은 뭐지 어디에 돈을 써야 할까 스트레스가 들 때 이유를 찾아보지 않고 충동과 습관으로 사모아 놓은 것들. 진심으로 내가 좋아하는 일이라고 의미 있는 소비라고 생각했던 내 과거가 안쓰럽고 우습다. 이젠 쓰레기일 뿐이지만 뭐..잘가라ㅋㅋ

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Since junior high school, this woman wore makeup daily, and reapplied lipstick every hour. Now, she’s tossing it and “the corset” away.

If wearing a full face of makeup or dedicating lots of time to your skincare routine makes you happy (and gives you confidence), that’s terrific. But if your beauty habits bring you more stress than joy, you might consider channeling these women and embracing minimalism.

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Ath-leisure Candles, CBD Sparkling Water, Luxury Incense: Wellness for the Holiday Season

The holidays have descended, along with the typical stressors of the season. This year, the lines between relaxation and retail therapy have officially blurred — there have never been more options on the market for consumers looking to chill out. Raise a glass of Champagne — er, canned sparkling CBD water — to that.

Here, a selection of the latest offerings in the wellness-meets-beauty space.

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L’Oréal’s Carol Hamilton on Her Approach to Acquisitions

Carol Hamilton has some advice for brand founders.
L'Oréal's group president of acquisitions shared insights on her approach to acquisitions, what brand founders should be paying more attention to and what she sees as the future of beauty.
Hamilton, who stepped into the newly created L'Oréal role in July, opened the talk by sharing some advice to brand founders.
"What makes new, different and better, and can you explain that in just a couple of sentences, ideally one, so your investors, the strategics and most importantly, your consumers get it," she said.
Asked what L'Oréal looks for in new brands, Hamilton said the company is interested in new business models in addition to great product ideas and new categories.
"We want to buy complementary brands, we don’t want to fill a space that we’ve already filled," Hamilton said. "We’re looking for that not only as it relates to a product idea or a category idea but also new business models. The market is changing so quickly, the way the consumer shops, so that very often, a brand’s business model will attract me and the company more than the product itself — even though product will always be queen and has to reign supreme. But once you have that fantastic product, the business model can be extremely compelling to us.”
L'Oréal, she said, looks to acquire companies and brands that are between $25 million and $50 million in size, with double-digit profitability.
"We believe strongly in the importance of profitability and then bringing something that is new to us, where we’re going to learn more from you than maybe you will learn from us," she said.
And whereas some are forecasting a slowdown in M&A, Hamilton is hopeful.
“If you measure the number of deals that have been consummated, yes, there’s been a slowdown," she said. "If you measure the activity, the number of brands, the interest level, the competition that is out there, we are at an all-time high of furious pace and interest. It’s going to continue.”
She also advised founders to focus on building their e-commerce platforms separately from those of their retail partners.
"So many founders will go along with the retailer dot-com, which is a very good way to become digitally savvy, but it is not the same as owning your own database and really understanding your consumer," she said.
Asked for where she sees beauty heading, Hamilton pointed to wellness.
“Beauty is going to be much bigger because beauty is tapping into tech, but also tapping into a much bigger part of our lifestyles, whether it’s how we work out and the products that we need, how we eat, what we eat, and the nutrition associated with it and what we want to put on our bodies as a result of it," she said. "I see this expansion of beauty into health, wellness, athletics and everything associated with the way a woman lives her life. Meditation, all of those things are going to influence the way we look at beauty going forward. We can’t just look at the traditional categories of the past or we’ll be stuck in a rut.”
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Dash Hudson’s Jenny Pratt Taps Into Users to Create Content

Dash Hudson aims to show there are three crucial areas that brands should focus on to grow their Instagram followings: user-generated content, Instagram Stories and product imagery.
Jenny Pratt, senior director of customer success of Dash Hudson, which is a visual marketing platform that helps brands measure their Instagram efforts, stressed the importance of brands utilizing user-generated content for their own Instagram feeds. To give an example of successfully using user-generated content, she pointed out Herbivore Botanicals, which has 60 to 80 percent of its Instagram content coming from users.
“There is an authenticity here,” she said. “There is a realness that goes above and beyond of a traditional heritage brand that can be very focused with polished and stylized pieces of content. A lot of brands have seen success using user-generated content because it is bringing that realness and authenticity to their Instagram feeds.”
The second best practice she stated was focusing on Instagram Stories. Similar to using user-generated content, Pratt explained that Instagram Stories also allow for authenticity.
“Instagram Stories is another space that is very raw and organic,” she said. “It can be a little intimidating for brands because a lot of the time these videos are captured in the moment and shared, but brands are having success with this at the moment. They are short lived, so as much as it can be scary, it’s actually a really interesting space to play and experiment.”
Pratt mentioned beauty brand Youth to the People as one that does well with Instagram Stories. This brand uses the platform to inform their customers on restocks, show behind-the-scenes videos and request customer feedback, among other things.
She finished her presentation by focusing on the imagery brands use to showcase their products. Pratt mentioned Moon Juice, a plant-based ingestible and skin-care company, as a brand that does this successfully by using imagery that highlights the colors and textures of the products.
“A lot of content is based around highlighting the product and bringing it to the consumers hands through the lens of Instagram,” she said. “Consumers are looking to get beyond those editorialized, stylized pieces of content and they want to really feel the product. They want to see those raw, organic moments that truly bring the product to life.”
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11 myths about beauty: what you need to know to stay attractive?

The contents

The beauty myth No. 1: every day makeup is not

The beauty myth No. 2: moisturizers do not protect from wrinkles

The beauty myth No. 3: marked “hypoallergenic” is suitable for all

The beauty myth No. 4: facial gymnastics will protect against facial wrinkles

The beauty myth No. 5: from the creams there is addictive

The beauty myth No. 6: to remove moles can not

The beauty myth No. 7: you need to drink plenty of water to avoid wrinkles

The beauty myth No. 8: you need to wipe the face with ice

The beauty myth No. 9: hair Postrigan helps them to grow faster

The beauty myth No. 10: even tan speaks of a healthy skin

The beauty myth No. 11: nail Polish harmful to your nails

Beauty, as we know, requires sacrifice. To remain attractive, the girls go to different tricks. But not always, these measures are justified, experts say. Besides, there are plenty of myths about beauty. Today we will talk about these and help you to understand how to make in order to remain attractive.

The beauty myth No. 1: every day makeup is not

It is believed that daily makeup hurts my face. But in fact, negative consequences can arise because of the makeup, and because of the reluctance to wash off makeup before going to bed. As you know, the skin needs oxygen to stay attractive and young. Day cosmetics Vice versa will be useful. Because its composition is a moisturizing and protective components that help to protect against harmful UV rays and environmental stress.

The beauty myth No. 2: moisturizers do not protect from wrinkles

Who invented this myth, he is not versed in the intricacies and are not familiar with modern cosmetology. Perhaps once it was. But the beauty industry is not standing still. At this time, a huge number of moisturizing creams and other means that prevent the formation of wrinkles and allow you to stay attractive for a long time. How to understand which tool to buy? In its composition must be UV-filters and vitamins with antioxidants.

The beauty myth No. 3: marked “hypoallergenic” is suitable for all

If the cream is marked “hypoallergenic”, it will fit anyone, think girls. But in fact it is not. Most often such tools are not part of common ingredients-allergens. Cosmetics based on natural components is not suitable for everyone. Therefore, you should get acquainted with the squad before buying a cream or shampoo.

The beauty myth No. 4: facial gymnastics will protect against facial wrinkles

Facial muscles are attached directly to the skin. Therefore regular exercises for the face does not help to get rid of facial wrinkles, which is already on the skin. Therefore, to remain attractive, it is necessary to solve the problem in the complex, including at the expense of proper nutrition.

The beauty myth No. 5: from the creams there is addictive

No, no and no again. Cream does not can be addictive and cease to operate on the skin. Respectively, and change them every month also should not be. On the contrary, the skin is under stress from the new cream. The choice of tools should take into consideration only the time of year. After the summer it is advisable to use the cream to maintain optimal pH, and in winter — nourishing and moisturizing.

The beauty myth No. 6: to remove moles can not

A mole is a pigment in the skin, they can be different shapes and colors, respectively, and species. Most moles are completely harmless, but under the influence of different factors develop into melanoma. Why doctors even recommend to get rid of them. But before you do this procedure, you must obtain expert advice.

The beauty myth No. 7: you need to drink plenty of water to avoid wrinkles

Indeed, water can help slow down aging of the skin. But there are no guarantees that a huge amount of liquid has a beneficial effect on her condition. Want to stay attractive? Just drink water as much as you want.

The beauty myth No. 8: you need to wipe the face with ice

Unfortunately, this procedure has its contraindications. Wipe the face with cold items can be dangerous for those who have very sensitive and dry skin. This can lead to the disruption of blood flow, formation of edema and spider veins, loss of elasticity. It is better to use other cosmetic products in order to remain attractive.

The beauty myth No. 9: hair Postrigan helps them to grow faster

Often podstrigach, telling barbers to make hair grow faster. Although well aware that this is nothing more than a ploy to lure customers. Hair grows with the same speed is always about a centimeter per month. A haircut is only useful to remove split ends.

The beauty myth No. 10: even tan speaks of a healthy skin

Tan is a protective reaction of the skin to various injuries. If you have it smooth and good, then most likely, it suggests that she tries something to defend. Besides not the fact that constant tanning allows you to remain attractive, because it show signs of aging, wrinkles.

The beauty myth No. 11: nail Polish harmful to your nails

It is believed that the varnish does not allow the nails to breathe. But nails are dead cells that do not take the oxygen. If the nails need to breath, the paint simply wouldn’t hold on because of high humidity. So varnish will only make you attractive, and with proper care it will not harm your beauty and health.

Want to stay attractive? Follow these four tips that will help to preserve the beauty.