Medic warns of painkiller: when Ibuprofen is causing physical damage – Video

Headaches are uncomfortable and inconvenient – many patients to swallow therefore Ibuprofen. However, much too often and for too long. Nobody thinks of the long-term damage. Pain experts such as Sven Gottschling’t ask for more, therefore, that the painkiller is freely available.

By excessive ingestion of Ibuprofen you risk stomach, according to the experts, and intestinal bleeding, and kidney damage, Gottschling to FOCUS Online. Frightening: In Germany there is every year more deaths caused by internal bleeding as a result of painkiller use, as in traffic accidents, so Gottschling. With a prescription, the misuse could be curbed.

Ibuprofen oral never longer than seven days

In the case of acute pain you may also access times to Ibuprofen, directs the physician. In the case of a tension headache or a sports injury, for example, a couple of days, but not longer than three to seven days.

But what you realize that you overdo it with the pain pills? According to Sven Gottschling has symptoms in the prompt Discontinuation of the drug withdrawal.
Who needs regular medication for pain, should therefore refrain from over-the-counter. Morphine was the according to experts, less dangerous than Ibuprofen. Pain threaten to become chronic, opioids help. However, these must be prescribed by the doctor.

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Women unable to quit smoking while pregnant should take vit C pills

Daily vitamin C pills could reduce damage done to unborn babies’ lungs by pregnant mothers who smoke

  • Researchers gave half of a group of pregnant women vitamin C pills and the other half placebo pills
  • The babies of mothers who took 500 mg of vitamin C had healthier airways at three months old 
  • Smoking can lead to preterm birth, low birth weight, birth defects such as cleft lip, and reduced lung capacity
  • Scientists say the primary goal of health professionals should remain helping mothers quit smoking  

Pregnant women who struggle to quit smoking should take vitamin C to better protect the lungs of their unborn child, a new study suggests.

Researchers say babies, whose mothers took 500mg of vitamin C daily, had healthier airways at three months old than those whose mothers did not.

The team, led by Oregon Health & Science University, says the nutrient found in citrus fruits could provide a safe and inexpensive intervention for pregnant women hooked on cigarettes.

However, they stress that helping mothers quit smoking should remain the primary goal of health professionals and public health officials.  

A new study has found that pregnant women who smoked, but took 500 mg of vitamin C daily, had babies with healthier airways at three months old than those whose mothers did not (file image)

It is well known that women who smoke while pregnant create several health problems for their children.

Smoking raises the risk of premature birth, vaginal bleeding and problems with the placenta. 

It also increases a baby’s risk of defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate or a low birth weight. 

Additionally, if women smoke while pregnant, it could damage unborn babies’ lungs at crucial points in their development – leading to reduced lung capacity in later life.

For the study, the team based their tests on forced expiratory flows (FEFs), which measures the speed at which air coming out of the lungs during the middle portion of a forced exhalation. 

Researchers say these tests are a good measure of function because they can detect airway obstruction.

The team looked at more than 250 pregnant smokers who began the study between 13 and 23 weeks into their term.

All of the women received counseling on quitting smoking throughout the course of the study, with about one in 10 doing so.

Half of the women received a vitamin C pill and the other half received a placebo pill.    


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The babies of the women who took vitamin C pills did better on FEFs than the babies of those who took placebo pills. 

‘Smoking during pregnancy reflects the highly addictive nature of nicotine that disproportionately affects the most vulnerable populations,’ said lead author Dr Cindy McEvoy, a professor of pediatrics at Oregon Health & Science University. 

‘Finding a way to help infants exposed to smoking and nicotine in the womb recognizes the unique dangers posed by a highly advertised, addictive product and the lifetime effects on offspring who did not choose to be exposed.’ 

Dr McEvoy says the study supports the hypothesis that cigarette smoking reduces the amount of vitamin C available in the body.

By taking a supplement, mothers can protect their cells from the damage caused by free radicals.  

In a previous study led by Dr McEvoy, her team found the babies of mothers born to smokers had better lung function 72 hours birth when their mothers took 500 mg of vitamin C compared to the same dose of a placebo. 

However, that study did not use FEFs to measure lung function, which is what doctors use to diagnose lung disease in adults and older children. 

The infants in this study will continued to be monitored for lung function and to have respiratory outcomes analyzed.

For future studies, the researchers want to see if pregnant women taking vitamin C supplements earlier in pregnancy could provide greater outcomes.  

Dr McEvoy says that although vitamin C may be ‘a safe and inexpensive intervention’, the primary goal should be helping mother quit smoking.  

‘Although vitamin C supplementation may protect to some extent the lungs of babies born to mothers who smoke during pregnancy, those children will still be at greater risk for obesity, behavioral disorders and other serious health issues,’ she said.

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Cocaine Cut With Anti-Worming Drug May Cause Brain Damage

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 — Cocaine is often cut with the anti-worming drug levamisole — and the combination is linked to brain damage, Swiss researchers report.

“We can assume from our findings that it is not just cocaine that changes the brain, but that the adulterant levamisole has an additional harmful effect,” said research leader Boris Quednow, from the University of Zurich.

“The sorts of cognitive impairment often exhibited by cocaine users may therefore be exacerbated by levamisole,” Quednow said in a university news release.

Cocaine is the second-most used illegal substance worldwide after marijuana. Local anesthetic agents, painkillers, caffeine and other substances are often added to street cocaine, the researchers said in background notes.

In Europe and the United States, levamisole is a common additive, possibly because it may increase or prolong cocaine’s effects, Quednow and his colleagues suggested.

The researchers analyzed hair samples to determine levels of cocaine and levels of levamisole in study participants. They ended up comparing 26 cocaine users with low levamisole exposure, 49 cocaine users with high levamisole exposure, and 78 people using no drugs.

In tests of mental and thinking skills, regular cocaine users scored worse on attention, working memory, long-term memory, and other mental functions compared to people who didn’t use cocaine. But those whose cocaine was cut with levamisole performed worst of all, according to the study.

Moreover, brain scans linked higher levamisole levels with impaired thinking and a thinned prefrontal cortex. This indicates levamisole has a toxic effect on the brain, the researchers concluded.

Although the study didn’t prove a cause-and-effect relationship, the authors called on public health officials to expand their drug-checking programs.

“Such programs mean users can have their drugs tested for purity and therefore avoid taking cocaine that has very high levels of levamisole,” Quednow said.

The findings were published recently in Translational Psychiatry.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about cocaine.

Posted: November 2018

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